How many reqs should a recruiter be able to handle?

The short answer is, “it depends.”

The medium response is 25-30.

This is the long answer:

When it comes to figuring out how many requisitions a recruiter should be able to handle, the variables are limitless. Nevertheless, I will mention the more notable considerations and some reasoning for each.

Quality of Hire: If you want the best of the best, its going to take a lot of selling to convince them to join your firm. Whether or not you represent a Fortune 50 company or a lower 1,000. If the person you want to hire is really good, chances are you will be competing with other companies who want them as well. On the flipside, if the role is not so critical and average workers are acceptable, a larger requisition load is not unreasonable.

Passive candidates vs Active Candidates: What type of candidate are you focused on? If you are targeting passive candidates, its going to be a longer sales cycle; such is the nature of that type. If you are grabbing people from a job board, a larger requisition load is not unreasonable. Moreover, its a logical assertion to say that the higher level of the job, the smaller the load.

Experience Level: The best recruiters know how to get things done whereas newbies have a learning curve. The proficiency of the worker has a direct impact on how much work can be handled. This is especially true if the recruiter has to source their own candidates.

Job Descriptions: If a recruiter is handling many different types of jobs then, I would think a smaller requisition load is logical because the recruiter will not be able to submit their candidates to multiple roles.

Employer Brand: If there is a low offer-acceptance rate, then requisition loads should be lowered; chances are so many searches will have to be extended or reopened. That being said, what do the company’s Glassdoor ratings look like? Is there a lot of turnover in the company? What does the stock price look like? Is the ticker trending down or up? If the employee referral rate is low, that suggests a difficult culture to recruit for.

Economic Conditions: If there is a recession in play and layoffs are common in the headlines, chances are candidate response rates will be high. On the other hand, if the economy is booming and the unemployment rate is low, recruiters will have to wait longer to hear back from potential hires.

Relationship Management: How responsive are the hiring managers? Do they reply to emails in a timely manner? Do they constantly cancel interview dates? The best recruiters are the ones who can best manage the hiring managers they support. It is worth mentioning, some hiring managers purport to be too busy to stop working long enough to interview the help they desperately need.

Administrative Support: Is the recruiter scheduling the screens, interview times, extending offers and on-boarding? Without the assistance of a recruiting coordinator, these duties can really extend the time to fill and requisition load tangentially.

Resource Allocation: What resources are available to the recruiter? Do they have access to LinkedIn Recruiter? Monster? Do they have sourcing support?

Although there is no universal standard applicable to every industry, personal experience and anecdotal evidence say 25-30. Said number is set on a mix of reqs; some high level passives, some active job seekers with a couple of purple squirrels filtered in. As you may imagine, this is a very controversial topic among recruiters (and sourcers for that matter.) I scanned the web to find commentary from recruiters on the topic. (See below) I also suggest checking out SourceCon’s State of Sourcing surveys as their data is invaluable on this topic.

ADDITIONAL INSIGHTS FROM THE WEB

…I’m a corporate recruiter and had a high of 48 openings at one time across 4 business groups (Marketing, Finance, Technical Sales Support [but not IT] and Purchasing). I average between 25-30. I’ve been there since June and have filled 45 positions, but that does include some internal moves (although I still have to coordinate internal interviews and help w/ salary discussions). We have a total of 4 recruiters, a coordinator, and a req carrying Director – will probably hire 300 or more in the next year including a whole lot of entry level college grads – we have a campus recruiter who focuses on that. Don’t hold me to that number- I’m taking a stab based on what I’ve seen this year and what I’ve heard as far as planning in my client groups. [source]

This is not a cut and dry type of answer. It really depends on how many openings you have, what level those opening are (non-exempt, exempt, manager, director, etc.), how “rare” or “common” the skill set you’re looking for is, if it’s a relocation position, etc. If you are an internal recruiter and working for a large corporation then your work load is probably 20 to 30 openings, at varying stages, at any given time. Therefore 8 to 12 hires per month would be about right. If you work for a midsize company, on average you probably have 10 to 15 openings and 6 to 8 hire per month is about what you’d expect. Smaller firms, (300-500) employees I’d expect your monthly job openings to average around 5-10 positions, therefore 0-5 hires per month. It really depends on so many factors and circumstances that I might think an average of 5 hires per month is great, and someone down the street will think that sucks! I’ve recruited for every scenario and size company I’ve described above and those are about what I used to average. [source]

On a large recruiting team, your chance to fill openings is obviously decreased if you are all recruiting from the same talent pool. Also if you are only supporting 2 hiring managers you won’t fill as many positions as a lone recruiter who supports many managers in the organization. Supposing there are an endless number of positions to fill each month for your two managers, a good recruiter should be able to fill at least 10 entry level positions, and 3-4 high level positions. If it’s just one or the other (entry or high level) those numbers obviously go up. All of this is also highly dependent on the hiring process within the organization. Some are much slower than others. [source]

I filled about 85 positions each year while working for large company. These were IT Jobs. Small companies. I filled 20 to 30 positions this year. Currently recruiting for company that 650 employees. I am on track to fill about 60 – 70 this year. So about 5 people per month this year. All IT jobs. [source]

The question is not so much how many can they fill but how many can they “effectively support at one time.” After reviewing our processes and streamlining efforts we are confident that our high volume recruiters can manage 80-100 positions which could translate into three to four open requisistions. Our high volume positions have set start dates in order to meet training class timelines. If a recruiter misses then we can roll those positions into the next req with a post mortem to try and avoid in the future (source, process, hiring manager responsivness, failed background checks). If the positions are ongoing with no set start date for training, being a midsize company, growing fast and that you mention “improving their internal process” I would agree with Peter’s numbers – 6-8. [source]

…depends on what the recruiter and the client want to have happen and what is valued most. As an onsite corporate recruiter, I most value being able to deliver high quality service. In my experience, high quality service = high quality results. For me personally, that means 30 req’s at the most. Anything after that, for a sustained period of time, my ability to deliver high quality service suffers. [source]

The number depends on the effort expended to fill the role. If you are proactively recruiting hard to find candidates I’d say about 1 -2 a month is about right If you are running ads or just reviewing write-ins on your ATS then you are no longer actively recruiting and the number could easily be 12-15+ open jobs on an on going basis. [source]

In my role, I recruit for all roles. Since we don’t have any high turnover roles and only a couple entry level type roles, we focus heavily on quality over quantity. I’m comfortable at 10-12 on an ongoing basis if that mixed between individual contributor roles and some management roles. 15 is my stretch for frontloading and peak periods. Since I currently have 30 openings, I hired a temp recruiter to help me. It all really depends on the role of the recruiter at the organization. So much of my role is employer branding, networking, blogging, and attending a significant amount of career fairs. So it’s possible that my metrics are a little more modest than some. But again, my role goes beyond just back to back phone screens all day. [source]

I was a guest on Voice of America

Recently, I was a guest of “Voice of America” where I discussed my views on the job market and what employers and jobseekers should be considering. In case you are unfamiliar with VOA, here is a bit of their history, gleaned from their website.

The Voice of America (VOA) is a dynamic international multimedia broadcaster with service in more than 40 languages. Serving an estimated weekly global audience of 236.8 million, VOA provides news, information, and cultural programming through the Internet, mobile and social media, radio, and television. VOA is funded by the U.S. Government through the Broadcasting Board of Governors.

Check out the tweet below to catch the part of the broadcast I was in. Likewise, you can visit the website for the rest of the story.

How To Find (More) Female Engineers on LinkedIn

I was pleasantly surprised to get a shout-out from fellow comics geek and SourceCon superfan – Jess Roberts. Jess recapped one of the strategies I shared at the SourceCon Atlanta meetup last month. (Good times!) Basically, it was all about finding female engineers on LinkedIn.

female software developer

After skimming the article, I quickly scrolled down to the comments to see what other strategies my fellow sourcers have suggested. Alas, I saw none, then again, the article just posted. So, as I wait with abated breath to discover new tactics from the sourcing community, I will throw one more tip out there.

Search the term, “on maternity leave.” Yeah, simple I know. How many men are on “maternity leave” these days? I would guess none. At this writing, there are 1,861 results.

How to find female software developers on LinekdIn

As you may have noticed, on the bottom right side of the image, I refined my search by only those in the “Information Technology” and “Computer Software” services. At this writing, there are 1,861 results! Refine the search further by adding titles. See for yourself here > http://j.mp/2vfHTdG

If I add “software developer” to the “Title” section of my search, I get 18 female software developers.

If I add “software engineer” to the Title, I get 43 results.

A search for programmer gets me 8 results.

I add a tech word like java, I get 4 results.

If I refine my search to only those women in the USA with the title of developer or engineer, further refined by IT and software industry I get a whopping 53 results.  If I remove the industry restrictions, I get 139 results. Hmm… Not a lot of results with this search but, some options to recruit nonetheless.

So, what do you think of this strategy? Let me know in the comments below or better yet, on the SourceCon blog with Jess’ blog post.

Until the next SourceCon event in Austin, TX (whoop-whoop), happy hunting!

Jim

Accredited Webinar: How to Recruit in a World of Robots and Automation – the Future of Sourcing

click here

Accredited Webinar: How to Recruit in a World of Robots and Automation – the Future of Sourcing
Thu, Nov 17, 2016 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM EST

Click here to sign up now!

This webinar has been pre-approved for 1 hour of general recertification credit by the HR Certification Institute.

Everyone is talking about artificial intelligence and the age of smart robots and their wide-ranging implications on society in general.

However, what does the future hold for sourcers in human resources and professionals in talent acquisition, especially in a world where algorithms and smart technology rule? Will the middle man’s role just survive, or will it excel and thrive?

Part sharing of scientific fact and part crystal-ball-gazing, Jim Stroud will share a cautionary and highly interesting view of things to come in HR as we move into and through artificial intelligence.

In this webinar, you’ll learn:

  • What the future technology landscape is evolving into for HR and for sourcers
  • How to ensure sourcers survive automation in a data-dominated landscape
  • How to adapt to the future behavior of passive and active candidates

This webinar is hosted by the HRO Today Talent Acquisition Thought Leadership Council.
Click here to sign up now!

About Jim Stroud

Jim serves Randstad Sourceright as senior director of RPO recruiting strategies and support, where he alleviates the sourcing headaches of organizations worldwide. He has also consulted for companies like Microsoft, Google and Siemens, as well as a host of startup companies. He has also created four online properties, managed an award-winning blog, published a weekly newsletter for jobseekers, co-hosted a popular technology podcast and produced multiple web series devoted to such topics as job searching, recruiting, technology and language learning. Entrepreneur, Black Enterprise and The HR Examiner have all cited Jim for his digital influence.

Pokemon Go Get a Job!

Would You Believe Real People Are Actually Finding Jobs Playing Pokémon Go? Jim Stroud shares examples of how companies are taking advantage of the Pokemon craze to find workers for their enterprises. This episode was inspired by a Job Mob article written by Jacob Share.



Related links:

# Would You Believe Real People Are Actually Finding Jobs Playing Pokémon Go?” http://buff.ly/2bSPrgc

# How this Seattle startup is using Pokémon Go to recruit tech employees http://buff.ly/2bv2TDj

# Love Pokemon Go? Apply for These Jobs at Niantic Labs http://buff.ly/2bv2JLU

# Dear Millennials: Enough Pokemon GO Already. Go Get a Job… http://buff.ly/2btejtN

# You could earn a living playing Pokemon Go http://buff.ly/2bv41GR

# Now you can get PAID to play Pokemon Go – job listing appears for Pokemon Master http://buff.ly/2c7sDtD

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READ BOOKS BY JIM STROUD

# The Number One Job Hunting Book In the World! | https://www.createspace.com/5096124

# Resume Forensics: How To Find Free Resumes and Passive Candidates On Google | https://www.createspace.com/4228076

# Content Is The New Sourcing: Strategies for Attracting and Engaging Passive Candidates | https://www.createspace.com/4693823