Is it right to profit on prison labor?

23 | When you think of prisoners working inside of a jail, what comes to mind? Prisoners cooking, mopping floors, folding clothes…? Yes, all of those are certainly true and now you can add one more – training artificial intelligence algorithms. In this episode, I talk about the pros and cons (pun intended) of prison labor.


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About the host:

Over the past decade, Jim Stroud has built an expertise in sourcing and recruiting strategy, public speaking, lead generation, video production, podcasting, online research, competitive intelligence, online community management and training. He has consulted for such companies as Microsoft, Google, MCI, Siemens, Bernard Hodes Group and a host of startup companies. During his tenure with Randstad Sourceright, he alleviated the recruitment headaches of their clients worldwide as their Global Head of Sourcing and Recruiting Strategy.  He now serves ClickIQ as its VP, Product Evangelist.

PODCAST TRANSCRIPT

When you think of prisoners working inside of a jail, what comes to mind? Prisoners cooking, mopping floors, folding clothes…? Yes, all of those are certainly true and now you can add one more – training artificial intelligence algorithms. I’ll explain, after this.


I have a question for Talent Acquisition Managers, how many jobs do you advertise a year? 100? 500? 10,000 or more? If so, let me give you a tip on how to maximize your job adverting budget. And that tip is, ClickIQ.

ClickIQ’s automated job advertising platform manages, tracks and optimizes the performance of your job advertising in real time, focusing your money where it’s needed most to reach both active and passive job seekers across Indeed, Google, Facebook, Instagram and an extensive network of job boards.

So, talent acquisition managers, if you want to make sure you are getting the most value out of your job advertising budget, I highly suggest you check out ClickIq online at www.clickiq.us. Or, you can email me directly. My email is jim at-click-dot-us

That’s right! I was so impressed by the technology behind ClickIQ that I joined the company. I think you will be impressed as well.Again, on the web – www.clickiq.us or email me directly jim at-click-dot-us.

You’ll be glad you did.

The startup company Vainu is building a comprehensive database of companies around the world that helps businesses find contractors to work with. To accomplish that aim, they need a lot of data analyzed and classified and that’s where prison labor comes in. Prisoners read through hundreds of thousands of business articles scraped from the internet and label whether, for example, an article is about Apple the tech company or a fruit company that has “apple” in the name. This labeled data is then used to train an algorithm that manages the database.

The partnership between Vainu and 2 prisons, one in Helsinki and one in Turku, was a happy accident. Tuomas Rasila, the founder of Vainu, was brainstorming ways to process more data for his AI when the thought occurred to him that he could use prison labor. The Vainu offices happen to be in the same building as the headquarters of the Criminal Sanctions Agency (CSA), the government agency that oversees Finnish prisons.

Here’s a quote from The Verge and their story, “Inmates in Finland are training AI as part of prison labor.”

Officials at the agency were excited to partner, according to Rasila, especially because the new jobs don’t require anything other than a laptop. “There’s no risk for violence,” he says, adding that when it comes to other forms of prison labor, like metalsmithing, access to tools that can be turned into makeshift weapons can make a prison workspace “a dangerous place.” Rasila estimates that, currently, a little less than 100 prisoners are working on Vainu’s project for a few hours a day.

Right now, Vainu and the CSA have an annual contract based on the number of tasks. The Vainu team hopes to expand elsewhere in Finland, and other countries where it can be hard to find people willing to do this type of work in local languages. To them, it’s a win-win situation. One motivation for the inmates is to make money, of course, but “a selling point of this was that the demand for training AI is actually increasing significantly, globally,” Rasila says.

This idea of using prison labor for profit is highly controversial. Some say that prisoners are exploited; most making anywhere between $0.00 – $2.00 hourly. In some cases, time is taken off of their sentence in exchange for their labor. Depending on who you ask, this is a good thing; while to others, its modern slavery. I can’t think of a better case study to see both sides than the fashion industry.

Take the case of Carcel, a Danish brand founded in 2016 specifically to provide incarcerated women with jobs, training and, possibly, a crime-free future. On any given day, prisoners at a women’s penitentiary center in Peru, serving long sentences predominantly for drug-related crimes as well as murder, human trafficking and robbery are weaving and knitting luxurious alpaca wool sweaters, deep-pile roll-necks and silky-soft track pants, destined to be sold to wealthy shoppers. More than two years into the program, both Carcel’s founders and the Peruvian prison authorities say the project has been a measurable success. However, social media had a different view.

Carcel introduced a new line of silk garments produced from women’s jails in Thailand. On Twitter, a company spokesman said, “We are proud of the work we do and the women we employ. We work in prisons to give women the opportunity to earn and provide for their families. We believe in fair and equal employment rights inside as well as outside of prison, which means that employment is chosen freely, living wages are paid and no discrimination is practices. These conditions have to be in place for us to work with any prison.”

One twitter response was “Your “sustainable business model” includes the need for women to be in prisons.”

Another, “If you make ANY profit, that is money from slavery.”

Another, “You “work in prisons” (actually the prisoners work) because it means labor is cheap and controllable. This gives you greater profit margins for your over-priced rags.”

Another, “You’re going straight to hell”

And the comments continued to slip even lower than that.

Carcel is not the only company selling clothes made by inmates. There is Prison Blues in the USA and Pieta, which like Carcel, is in Peru. All claim they can create a profitable and sustainable business model while also providing new jobs and opportunities for prisoners. In the case of Pieta, inmates don’t just make the clothes, they also contribute to the designs, act as models for advertising campaigns and are paid a portion of the sale price for each unit of clothing they produce. Upon release, former inmates can continue working with Pietà, or seek jobs at other companies with Pietà’s recommendation and support.

So is using prison labor exploitive or, is it a tool for rehabilitation? I wanted to know what a prisoner who has worked at a jail had to say, just for some insight from their perspective. I did some research and found this article from the Los Angeles Times called, “Think prison labor is a form of slavery? Think again.”

Here’s are some quotes from a former prisoner.

My prison job made me feel like I was fulfilling my existential duty to society: I was contributing. It doesn’t surprise me that prison work assignments are credited with reducing recidivism. Any change for good that happened within me while I was incarcerated grew out of my job. If I feel that way about my time making chicken a la king, an inmate who’s saving lives fighting fires must feel it 10 times over.

Some call prison labor the new Jim Crow because of the outsized number of black and brown inmates in U.S. prisons. It’s a facile charge, and worse, it may be keeping progressive companies away from prison projects. Socially conscious businesses and agencies are likely to pay inmates higher wages, train them for better jobs and do more to prepare them for life after prison — if those companies aren’t scared away by vociferous critics of prison labor.

Whole Foods used to sell goat cheese made from milk produced on a prison farm in Colorado. “We felt supporting suppliers who found a way to be part of paid, rehabilitative work being done by inmates would help people get back on their feet and eventually become contributing members of society,” a company spokesman said. Whole Foods ended the program in 2015, after consumer protests I can only assume came from people who’ve never been incarcerated. Anyone who’s done time wouldn’t deny a fellow prisoner that kind of lifeline.

I like the idea of prisoners learning a skill and working as it supports the notion that once they are released, they will not return to a life of crime but become a productive member of society. At least, that’s what I think. I want to hear what you have to say. Leave a comment?

If you love what you heard, hate what you heard or, don’t know what you just heard, I want to know about it. You can leave a comment concerning this podcast on my website at www.JimStroud.com. In addition to finding source material and related information for this podcast episode, you’ll find other goodies that I hope will make you smile. And if you have not already, please subscribe to my website. Your continued support keeps  this podcast train chugging down the track. Whoot-whoot, whoot-whoot, whoot-whoot…

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Would you work for a machine?

22 | Would you work for a machine? Some people are working for a machine right now, although they may not be aware of it. Could you be one of them? In this episode, I discuss humans and machines working together and its effect on the future of work.


Click here to listen to this on Anchor.fm

Subscribe to this podcast via your favorite podcast platform!

About the host:

Over the past decade, Jim Stroud has built an expertise in sourcing and recruiting strategy, public speaking, lead generation, video production, podcasting, online research, competitive intelligence, online community management and training. He has consulted for such companies as Microsoft, Google, MCI, Siemens, Bernard Hodes Group and a host of startup companies. During his tenure with Randstad Sourceright, he alleviated the recruitment headaches of their clients worldwide as their Global Head of Sourcing and Recruiting Strategy.  He now serves ClickIQ as its VP, Product Evangelist.

PODCAST TRANSCRIPT

Would you work for a machine? Some people are working for a machine right now, although they may not be aware of it. Could you be one of them? I discuss humans and machines working together and its effect on the future of work; right after this message.

I have a question for Talent Acquisition Managers, how many jobs do you advertise a year? 100? 500? 10,000 or more? If so, let me give you a tip on how to maximize your job adverting budget. And that tip is, ClickIQ.

ClickIQ’s automated job advertising platform manages, tracks and optimizes the performance of your job advertising in real time, focusing your money where it’s needed most to reach both active and passive job seekers across Indeed, Google, Facebook, Instagram and an extensive network of job boards.

So, talent acquisition managers, if you want to make sure you are getting the most value out of your job advertising budget, I highly suggest you check out ClickIq online at www.clickiq.us. Or, you can email me directly. My email is jim at-click-dot-us

That’s right! I was so impressed by the technology behind ClickIQ that I joined the company. I think you will be impressed as well. Again, on the web – www.clickiq.us or email me directly jim at-click-dot-us.

You’ll be glad you did.

Do you know what algorithmic management is? According to the Data and Society Research Institute, “Algorithmic management is a diverse set of technological tools and techniques to remotely manage workforces, relying on data collection and surveillance of workers to enable automated or semi-automated decision-making.” Translation: Instead of working for the man, you are working for the machine.

  • Services like Uber and Lyft exert what some call “continuous, soft surveillance” through data collection of drivers’ behaviors, which is fed into automated performance reports. While drivers have the freedom to log in or log out of work at will, once they’re online, their activities on the platform are heavily monitored. For instance, drivers’ movements are tracked using GPS location, and other behaviors such as acceleration, working hours, and braking habits are monitored through their phones. All of that data is not only used to evaluate drivers but also to influence their behavior. For example, Uber’s “surge pricing” system. At certain times, in certain locations, both riders and drivers receive notification that rides will be provided at higher rates, thus nudging more drivers to be available in a high-demand location. Such a system reveals how algorithms can cause disaggregated work forces, supposedly independent and flexible, to behave in ways that are good for the company as a whole. [Source: Data and Society]
  • In 2016, UPS drivers began receiving driving directives from ORION (On-Road Integrated Optimization and Navigation), an algorithm developed internally by UPS to optimize delivery routes by finding the most time-and cost-effective trip routes for a delivery. The company claims the algorithm has reduced unnecessary delivery truck travel by 100 million miles annually. [Source: Data and Society]
  • Percolata is a company that installs sensors in shops that measure the volume and type of customers flowing in and out, combines that with data on the amount of sales per employee, and calculates what it describes as the “true productivity” of a shop worker: a measure it calls “shopper yield”, or sales divided by traffic. Percolata then gives management a list of employees ranked from lowest to highest by shopper yield. Its algorithm builds profiles on each employee — when do they perform well? When do they perform badly? It learns whether some people do better when paired with certain colleagues, and worse when paired with others. It uses weather, online traffic and other signals to forecast customer traffic in advance. Then it creates a schedule with the optimal mix of workers to maximise sales for every 15-minute slot of the day. Managers press a button and the schedule publishes to employees’ personal smartphones. People with the highest shopper yields are usually given more hours. [Source: Financial Times]

There has been a lot of concern about robots taking jobs away. If you were to do a search engine search on “robots verses whatever your job title is” no doubt, you would see lots and lots and lots of articles detailing how the machines were taken over, stealing jobs away and basically destroying your life. With respect, any alarms of progress will not stymie progress. In an earlier century, people protested the steam engine, the cotton gin, the spinning jenny because the new technology threated their way of life. Long story short, civilization advanced and – spoiler alert, it will continue to do so. And with the case of robots and automation, that’s not a bad thing.

  • Daniela Rus is the, director of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab. She was speaking at a conference on the future of work and had this to say.
  • And this from CNN Business, Unbabel, a Lisbon-based startup, combines AI technology with human expertise to perfect language translation. Here’s a clip
  • And one more, this time from CNBC.  They interview Tom Doris of Liquidnet who says artificial intelligence should be seen as a tool for human decision makers in investments, and should not be seen as an automated process.

So, should we all relax about the machines taking over the workplace and just, get used to it? Well, yes, as long as human beings are part of the process.  The moment you remove people from the decision- making process and put your trust solely in machines and algorithms; then you have legitimate cause to be concerned about the future of work.  At least, I think so. What do you think? Leave a comment, I want to know.

If you love what you heard, hate what you heard or, don’t know what you just heard, I want to know about it. You can leave a comment concerning this podcast on my website at www.JimStroud.com. In addition to finding source material and related information for this podcast episode, you’ll find other goodies that I hope will make you smile. And if you have not already, please subscribe to my website. Your continued support keeps  this podcast train chugging down the track. Whoot-whoot, whoot-whoot, whoot-whoot…

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What is the one thing every Talent Acquisition Manager should know?

What is the one thing every #TalentAcquistion manager should know? I posed that question to Glen Johnson who a very interesting response. Spoiler alert! #Empathy plays a role in his advice. Tune in to this special “extra” episode to hear what he had to say and a special shout out to my friends at ClickIQ.

File this one under: #recruitment #candidateexperience #bestadvice

The Pros and Cons of Predictive Policing

21 | If you had a magic computer that could predict when crimes would take place, would you use it? Would you share it with the police so they could prevent people from becoming victims? Well, believe it or not, the police have such a system and have been exercising it to great effect. The technology and processes behind it is called “Predictive Policing” and it is a very controversial trend  spreading across the USA. I discuss the good and the bad of this, in this episode. | Click here to support my Starbucks habit and financially support this podcast.


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Subscribe to this podcast via your favorite podcast platform!

About the host:

Over the past decade, Jim Stroud has built an expertise in sourcing and recruiting strategy, public speaking, lead generation, video production, podcasting, online research, competitive intelligence, online community management and training. He has consulted for such companies as Microsoft, Google, MCI, Siemens, Bernard Hodes Group and a host of startup companies. During his tenure with Randstad Sourceright, he alleviated the recruitment headaches of their clients worldwide as their Global Head of Sourcing and Recruiting Strategy.  He now serves ClickIQ as its VP, Product Evangelist.

PODCAST TRANSCRIPT

Hi, I’m Jim Stroud and this is my podcast.

One of my favorite TV shows of all time is – “Person of Interest.” Do you know that show? In it, a man invents a sentient artificial intelligence system then uses it to protect people before crimes are committed against them. This is how the show begins…

What would you say are the odds of a machine like that existing today? Hah! I think the odds are… Very good. I’ll explain after this…

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On the tv show – Person of Interest, a team of people operating outside of the law, protect American citizens with the help of a sentient artificial intelligence system. Although I cannot say with 100% surety that such a machine exists, I think the basic building blocks of such device are already in play. And those blocks make up the trend of “Predictive Policing,” which is technology and processes that stop crimes, likely to occur, before they happen.  Let me quote a few articles to prove my point.

The New York Times says this, quote…

Mr. Brown, whose criminal record includes drug and assault charges, is at the center of an experiment taking place in dozens of police departments across the country, one in which the authorities have turned to complex computer algorithms to try to pinpoint the people most likely to be involved in future violent crimes — as either predator or prey. The goal is to do all they can to prevent the crime from happening.

The strategy, known as predictive policing, combines elements of traditional policing, like increased attention to crime “hot spots” and close monitoring of recent parolees. But it often also uses other data, including information about friendships, social media activity and drug use, to identify “hot people” and aid the authorities in forecasting crime.  

Business Insider has this to say, quote…

Predictive policework is rooted in complex mathematical models, but the basic premise is actually quite simple. A foundational paper on modeling crime compares crime to earthquakes to explain the rationale.

Just as earthquakes tend to lead to more earthquakes nearby and in the near future, gang retaliations, serial offenders, and repeated burglaries on a single location tend to create clusters of criminal offences that, with the right algorithms, police can forecast.

Previous predictive policing methods primarily focused on finding locations where crimes were likely to occur. A report from the nonprofit RAND Corporation, however, suggests that predictive policing can help forsee not only the location, but the times of crimes as well as individuals likely to commit future offenses. It can even predict those likely to be victims of crimes.  

And here’s one more quote; this time from Digital Trends Quote…

Cortica, an Israeli company with deep roots in security and AI research, recently formed a partnership in India with Best Group to analyze the terabytes of data streaming from CCTV cameras in public areas. One of the goals is to improve safety in public places, such as city streets, bus stops, and train stations.

It’s already common for law enforcement in cities like London and New York to employ facial recognition and license plate matching as part of their video camera surveillance. But Cortica’s AI promises to take it much further by looking for “behavioral anomalies” that signal someone is about to commit a violent crime.

The software is based on the type of military and government security screening systems that try to identify terrorists by monitoring people in real-time, looking for so-called micro-expressions — minuscule twitches or mannerisms that can belie a person’s nefarious intentions. Such telltale signs are so small they can elude an experienced detective but not the unblinking eye of AI.

The intent of all this surveillance is to protect the public and make everyone feel safe. And I applaud any and all in the security services who do what they do so I can sleep soundly at night and live another day; but, what is the cost of all this security? I don’t mean cost in dollars. I am referring to the psychological penalties. I also point to loss of liberty. Let me give you something to think about. For one, constant surveillance makes people alter their behavior and not just their bad behavior.

This quote from CJFECanadian Journalists for Free Expression. Quote…

So, how does mass surveillance affect the way we act? A 2016 study showed that people alter their behavior when they are reminded that the government is watching their activities. To test the effects of surveillance, participants in the study were first shown a fictional news headline about the United States targeting the Islamic State in an airstrike. They were then asked how they felt about the event while being regularly reminded that their responses were being monitored. As a result, most people in the study began to suppress opinions about the fictional event that they felt to be controversial or that they believed may lead to the government to scrutinize them.

Interestingly, the study also showed that participants who support the idea of mass surveillance were the most likely to suppress their own non-conformist opinions. | End Quote…

I very much like the idea of Predictive Policing. I especially like it when I hear of companies like PredPol which uses big data and machine learning to predict where crime will take place. One success the company highlights is a 22 percent drop in residential burglaries in Tacoma, Washington thanks in part to their technology.

And yet, I all too often hear a dissenting voice against such technologies because they are purported to be faulty and biased. Listen to this quote from The Register. Quote…  

American police and the judiciary are increasingly relying on software to catch, prosecute and sentence criminal suspects, but the code is untested, unavailable to suspects’ defense teams, and in some cases provably biased.

In a presentation at the DEF CON hacking conference in Las Vegas, delegates were given the example of the Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions (COMPAS) system, which is used by trial judges to decide sentencing times and parole guidelines.

“The company behind COMPAS acknowledges gender is a factor in its decision-making process and that, as men are more likely to be [repeat offenders] recidivists, so they are less likely to be recommended for probation,” explained Jerome Greco, digital forensics staff attorney for the Legal Aid Society.

“Women [are] thus more likely to get probation, and there are higher sentences for men. We don’t know how the data is swaying it or how significant gender is. The company is hiding behind trade secrets legislation to stop the code being checked.”

These so-called advanced systems are often trained on biased data sets, he said. Facial recognition software is often trained on data sets filled with predominantly white men, he said, making it less effective at correctly matching up people of color, according to research by academics.

So, where do I stand on all this? I confess to being a bit conflicted. Surveillance is necessary to keep us safe but it can go too far, such as with the social credit score happening in China. Maybe I would feel better about the government surveillance if there was an impartial auditor charged with monitoring these algorithms for fairness, an appeals process should someone be falsely accused of a crime by some machine and put a human in the loop. In other words, include a human being in all of this. For example, say some software on a CCTV camera identifies someone as a terrorist. Before the FBI is called in, a human being has to look at the footage and confirm that the person is who the machine thinks they are. I don’t know. Maybe they are already doing that. I hope so.

If you love what you heard, hate what you heard or, don’t know what you just heard, I want to know about it. You can reach me at my website – www.JimStroud.com. In addition to finding source material and related information for this podcast episode, you’ll find other goodies that I hope will make you smile. Oh, before I go, please financially support this podcast with a little somethin’-somethin’ in my virtual tip jar. (There’s a link in the podcast description.) Your generosity encourages me to keep this podcast train chugging down the track. Whoot-whoot, whoot-whoot, whoot-whoot…

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Whatever happened to employee privacy?

20 | If you have a social media account or a cell phone or an internet connection, then you have no privacy. I’m pretty sure you can agree with me there. Do a search on Duck Duck Go or some other search engine for “Facebook scandal,” “cell phone privacy scandal,” or “data hacked” and you will no doubt agree with me.  But have you ever considered your lack of privacy in the workplace? I’m going to share with you three stories and I want you to figure out whether or not they are true or false. Tune in to see if you can guess how far companies will go for the sake of efficiency.


Listen to this podcast on Anchor.fm.

Subscribe to this podcast via your favorite podcast platform!

About the host:

Over the past decade, Jim Stroud has built an expertise in sourcing and recruiting strategy, public speaking, lead generation, video production, podcasting, online research, competitive intelligence, online community management and training. He has consulted for such companies as Microsoft, Google, MCI, Siemens, Bernard Hodes Group and a host of startup companies. During his tenure with Randstad Sourceright, he alleviated the recruitment headaches of their clients worldwide as their Global Head of Sourcing and Recruiting Strategy.  He now serves ClickIQ as its VP, Product Evangelist.

PODCAST TRANSCRIPT

Hi, I’m Jim Stroud and this is my podcast.

If you have a social media account or a cell phone or an internet connection, then you have no privacy. I’m pretty sure you can agree with me there. Do a search on Duck Duck Go or some other search engine for “Facebook scandal,” “cell phone privacy scandal,” or “data hacked” and you will no doubt agree with me. But have you ever considered your lack of privacy in the workplace? I’m going to share with you three stories and I want you to figure out whether or not they are true or false. The first story begins after this special message…

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A certain man is interviewing for a job for a rather progressive company. How progressive are they? Rather than relying solely on resumes, they use a complex algorithm to scan a candidate’s social media accounts in order to discern their personality and cultural fit. Is this true or false?

This is true. Listen to a quote from The Wall Street Journal.

Nearly all Fortune 500 companies now use some form of automation — from robot avatars interviewing job candidates to computers weeding out potential employees by scanning keywords in resumes. And more and more companies are using artificial intelligence and machine learning tools to assess possible employees. DeepSense, based in San Francisco and India, helps hiring managers scan people’s social media accounts to surface underlying personality traits. The company says it uses a scientifically based personality test, and it can be done with or without a potential candidate’s knowledge. The practice is part of a general trend of some hiring companies to move away from assessing candidates based on their resumes and skills, towards making hiring decisions based on people’s personalities.

Story #2

A factory worker wears a helmet for safety reasons but, the helmet does more than protect the head from physical injury. It reads the brainwaves of the worker for changes in their mood and informs management of whether or not that worker should take a break, be reassigned or fired. Is this true or false?

This is true. Listen to this quote from the South China Morning Post.

On the surface, the production lines at Hangzhou (Hang-Joe) Zhongheng (joe-hung) Electric look like any other. Workers outfitted in uniforms, staff lines producing sophisticated equipment for telecommunication and other industrial sectors. But there’s one big difference – the workers wear caps to monitor their brainwaves, data that management then uses to adjust the pace of production and redesign workflows, according to the company. The company said it could increase the overall efficiency of the workers by manipulating the frequency and length of break times to reduce mental stress.

Hangzhou (Hang-Joe) Zhongheng (joe-hung) Electric is just one example of the large-scale application of brain surveillance devices to monitor people’s emotions and other mental activities in the workplace, according to scientists and companies involved in the government-backed projects. Concealed in regular safety helmets or uniform hats, these lightweight, wireless sensors constantly monitor the wearer’s brainwaves and stream the data to computers that use artificial intelligence algorithms to detect emotional spikes such as depression, anxiety or rage.

Story #3

Amazon is a master of efficiency. So much so, they recently patented a pair of Googles that will help its workers maneuver through their gigantic warehouses. If you were wearing these goggles, not only would you be more efficient, but the company would be able to monitor your every step. Is this true or false?

This is true. Listen to this quote from The Telegraph.

Amazon has sparked privacy concerns after filing a patent for augmented reality goggles that track the movement of warehouse workers. According to the patent, the e-commerce giant is interested in developing augmented reality goggles that workers could use to navigate through Amazon’s gigantic warehouses, guiding them to the right location. The patent, which was filed last year but made public on Thursday by the US Patents and Trademark Office, would mean the company could send orders to workers through visual cues. “In some embodiments […] the wearable computing device can be configured to provide worker instructions and/or visual indicators to a worker wearing the wearable computing device who is not moving or navigating through a fulfilment centre.” However, the patent application also states that the device could detect where a person is at all times and when they have stopped moving.

I suppose on some level; we are used to the idea of companies monitoring our emails and web activity; but what about those enterprises that seem to go the extra mile? How far is too far, when it comes to companies monitoring you? How concerned are you about your privacy at the office? No, really, I want to know. Leave me a comment? I want to know your point of view.

If you love what you heard, hate what you heard or, don’t know what you just heard, I want to know about it. You can reach me at my website – www.JimStroud.com. In addition to finding source material and related information for this podcast episode, you’ll find other goodies that I hope will make you smile. Oh, before I go, please financially support this podcast with a little somethin’-somethin’ in my virtual tip jar. (There’s a link in the podcast description.) Your generosity encourages me to keep this podcast train chugging down the track. Whoot-whoot, whoot-whoot, whoot-whoot…

Music related to this episode:

Wild Flower by Joakim Karud https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported— CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b… Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/AQWSIi1QU-o

Where Silence Is Nonexistent by A Himitsu https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsu Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b… Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/sXi_NANO3tA

S Strong – The Rover by S Strong https://soundcloud.com/s_strong Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b… Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/DhBCxKQPHiI